The Worst Food For Aging

On Saturday afternoon I made the most luscious, gluten-free lemon bars that are actually easier to make than regular wheat-flour lemon bars. (I shared the lemon bars with a “foodie” neighbor, who praised them, and I’m sharing the recipe with you below.) Then on Sunday morning in my email inbox were two emails dealing with the subject of gluten. The first email was sent by Jesse Cannone of the Healthy Back Institute and the subject line read: “This is THE #1 WORST Food for Your Joints, Blood Sugar and Skin.” I was curious what this food was because I’m currently following a nutrition protocol that will improve my joints, connective tissue … [Read more...]

Going Gluten-Free – My Family’s Dramatic Response

By Marianne Kring Removing gluten from my diet has been one of the most beneficial changes of my entire life. My two children and I are gluten-sensitive. My 16-year old daughter and my 19-year old son have been off gluten for almost three years now. Gluten-sensitivity is something you are born with, and it usually runs in families.  I have been having trouble with my digestive system off and on throughout my life, but could not figure out the cause.  When I was in my 30's I figured out I was lactose-intolerant, which is pretty easy to diagnose.  But that didn't get rid of my symptoms, which included gas, bloating, intestinal cramps … [Read more...]

Adolescence – Is It Harder On Parents Than On Adolescents?

I’ve read an interesting article in New York magazine recently that states that the period of life called adolescence can be harder on the parents of adolescents than it is on the adolescents themselves. The author of the article, Jennifer Senior (also author of the book, All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood), quotes a leading authority on puberty named Laurence Steinberg, a psychologist at Temple University and author of the book, Adolescence. Ms. Senior writes, It doesn’t seem to me like adolescence is a difficult time for the kids,” Steinberg says. “Most adolescents seem to be going through life in a very pleasant haze.” … [Read more...]

Parenting Teenage Girls – Challenges Parents Face

Why is my daughter so different since she hit adolescence? The most obvious difference between boys and girls when they hit adolescence is that while boys tend to withdraw, girls engage and often they engage with a fight. That is not to say that girls don't spend enormous amounts of time in their rooms, on the computer, or talking on the phone, however, they tend to pick battles and fight with their parents more often than teenage boys. Teenage girls struggle to regulate their emotions which often times feel overwhelming, confusing and "all over the place". This is what creates those moments where you may witness (or more often be on the … [Read more...]

Talking To Your Daughter About Her Body

A friend of mine emailed me an article on what to be mindful of when you talk to your daughter about her body. analgesic pills. I found the article insightful and helpful and I thought the readers of this magazine would benefit from it. The article has been republished in the Huffington Post and I'm sharing it below: How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: Don't talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works. Don't say anything if she's lost weight. Don't say anything if she's gained weight. If you think your daughter's body looks amazing, don't say that. Here are some things you can say … [Read more...]

Moods – Yours And Your Teenage Daughter’s

One morning I woke up feeling moody because I was really looking forward to a long earned “sleep in.” Instead, I opened my eyes far earlier than planned to a loud workman’s voice. It was an immediate bummer. I told myself, let it go. Then my husband walked in our bedroom and asked for something that required me getting up, before I was really awake. You can imagine how happy I was inside my head. I share this with you because this was the simple but also toxic trigger that almost ruled my morning. I’m sure some of you can relate to this scenario. As our teenagers stretch themselves to be seen, heard and known, they too are easily swayed by … [Read more...]

Ten Steps To Make Your Teen’s Dreams Come True

By Ken Rabow. Quick. Think of something you did today that stands out to you. Was it something funny? Something you are particularly proud of, or something embarrassing? When you were doing it, was the voice in your head a cheerleader, a soothing guide or a scolding judge? For most of us, it was the judge. By transforming a scolding judge into a soothing guide or even a cheerleader, you will begin making subtle sub-conscious daily decisions that will help you become your very best. Here are 10 steps to becoming fulfilled in your dreams. It works best and longest if you are willing to give in kind for what you receive. 1. In the … [Read more...]

Unleash the Power of Your Dreams

Besides paying attention to your intuition and inner nudges, you can pay attention to your dreams and by doing so, unleash the power of your dreams (which will go a long way toward helping you solve your and your family's problems and fulfill your higher purpose). This is because dreams are one of several ways the Divine uses to communicate with us, and if we pay attention we will gain the perspective and the assistance of the Divine. However, not many people remember their dreams and not long ago a reader of my articles emailed, asking me what to do so that he could remember his dreams. "Can you give me some insight into dreaming? I do … [Read more...]

Helping Your Kids Overcome Fear of Failure

Dr. Sherri Singer's article from last week, Why Failure Is Not Always A Bad Thing For Kids, addresses the very important topic of learning and striving for success (meaning whatever you want to accomplish) and to keep going at it rather than giving up in the process. Dr. Singer's article has a wealth of wisdom that may be overlooked by some readers because it was written from more of a logical, academic perspective rather than a personal and passionate one--which is why I'm revisiting her article and using my own personal experience to examine how we can cultivate a passion for learning and to instill more awareness of the value of lifelong … [Read more...]

Why Failure Is Not Always A Bad Thing For Kids

We have all heard, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again." What happens when you don't succeed, though? Do you really try again? Or do you give up? A new study by French researchers found that children who were told learning can be difficult, and that failing is a natural part of the learning process, actually performed better on tests than kids not given such reassurances. As a Psychologist who works with success and the benefits of failure every day, I believe there is no better way to take the punch out of failure and keep a kid going on work than to train them to fail with grace. In the study, they focused on a … [Read more...]